Africa Tips for Trips – 5


 

AFRICA TIPS FOR TRIPS

South Africa 2010 trip (continued)

Kiswahili (Swahili) is the national language of Kenya and Tanzania. Tswana is the national language of Botswana. English is widely spoken in these countries. You may want to learn a few words before you go.

SWAHILI HELPFUL PHRASES:

Swahili Words

Hello…..jambo
Cheetah….duma
Goodbye….kwaheri
Elephant….tembo
Please…..tafadhali
Lion….simba
Thank you…..asante
Hippo….kiboko
How much….pesa ngapi
Monkey….mbega

To eat….kula
Wildebeest….nyumbu
Water….maji
Zebra….pundamilia
Coffee….kahawa
Rhino….kifaru
Milk….maziwa
Pole Pole…slowly
Beer….pombe

In Botswana, Setswana is the national language, but English is well spoken

BOTSWANA (TSWANA LANGUAGE)

Yes Ea
No Aua
Hello Hallo
Good morning/afternoon/evening Dumela (to one person), Dumelang (to a group)

How are you? O Kae?
I am well Ke teng
Stay well Sala sentle
Go well Tsamaya sentle
Please Ka kopo
Thank you Ke a leboga
How much does it cost? Ke bokae?
Excuse me Ntshwarele
Do you speak English? O bua Sekhowa?
Go Siame means goodbye
Madi means money

South Africa has 11 official languages: English, Afrikaans (similar to Dutch), Zulu, Xhosa, Ndebele, Southern Sotho, Northern Sotho, Tsonga, Tswana, Venda and Swati. Most people in the urban areas understand and can speak basic English so, if your English is OK, it is not totally essential to learn any of these languages to get by as a tourist. However, its always appreciated when some local phrases are used but if you are not sure which language the person speaks then stick to English.

For instance Zulu is normally spoken in the Durban area whilst Xhosa is spoken by the locals in Cape Town. Also bear in mind that Afrikaans was regarded as the language of the old oppressive Nationalist Government pre 1994 and therefore even trying to say a few words to the locals in this language may be regarded as offensive. Best advice is to keep to English if the person is a complete stranger.


wordpress tutorial

 

Comments are closed